Penna. Budget 2012-13 Education Funding K-12

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bobguzzardi's picture
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The Centre Daily Times, serving Centre County, Penn State, frequently, has excellent news pieces. This article juxtaposes factual statements by Republican Governor Corbett and PSEA Democrat Rep. Scott Conklin. It is evident that Governor Corbett needs to cut spending because of revenue shortfall and because of immediate pension funding needs as well as long term pension underfunding liabilities and the $3 billion owed to Federal Government for Unemployment Funding deficit.

The Centre Daily on Corbett and Education Funding  (posted at www.grassrootspa.com, an indispensable site).

During Gov. Tom Corbett’s second budget address Tuesday afternoon, he accused critics of practicing “deception” and creating an “urban legend” about the $860 million that was cut from public schools last year.

Improperly used federal stimulus money was to blame, not his administration, Corbett argued

2012-13 year, four different line items for education funding would be consolidated into one block grant.

If you judge education funding on only those four line items, then every district gets an increase. But Corbett has also proposed getting rid of several other line items — the largest being the elimination of Accountability Block Grants, which fund full-day kindergarten programs in many districts across the state. That’s a $100 million cut, and it causes a wide variation among school districts. “Some districts are going to likely get more money and others are probably going to see a lot less,” said Thomas Gentzel, the executive director of the Pennsylvania School Boards Association.

Read more here:

The Philadelphia School District spends about $3 Billion dollars a year.

Here is the link to Governor's Budget Office Current and Proposed Budgets see "2012-13 Line-Item Appropriations" for details

In my opinion, the Governor has done an outstanding job of keeping spending in line. However, ACT 130 undid some of that good with $1.6 billion in new borrowing, much for political pork projects for Democrats, oddly, including restatement of $30 million to Comcast, a multibillion dollar international corporation, and $10 million to Janney, the billionaire financial services company as well as $3 million to a project in Northwest Phila that community opposes and $1.5 million for a vacant lot. READ MORE

This makes no sense to me.

I note that Centre Daily, frequently, has better coverage than any of southeast media.

 

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bobguzzardi's picture
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The graph below gives a historical context to 2012-13 budget. With a 33% increase in spending, there are few, I think, who would argue we have gotten a 33% increase in student learning performance, particularly, in light of dramatic drop out rates in Democratically controlled Philadelphia ( Notebooks 2012). Note that Phildelphia on time graducation has improved from 2002. I think this includes Charter Schools as well as conventional unionized, government operated schools.

                     

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bobguzzardi's picture
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these charts explain the reason that cuts are necessary. One big driver are the generous Defined Benefit Pensions which are not supported by actually sound funding of PSERS and SERS.

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