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converse auctions

Chester County Ramblings - Mon, 2017-02-20 15:07

I was going to antiques shows before I could spell “antique”. It was something in particular my late father loved to do, and for years my mother was a volunteer for the Philadelphia Antiques Show, and even I volunteered for a couple of years in the 90s.

Antiques shows and sales and auctions are just things I love. Even if most of the time I am just looking and not buying.

Many many years ago before there was a Public Storage at 55 Lancaster Ave. in Malvern, there was a local auction house – Josie Narcisi Auctions. I remember they used to run ads for “absolute auctions every Friday!”

Anyway I first bid at an auction at Josie Narcisi’s. When I was much younger (as in still living with my parents) my elderly neighbor and his housekeeper took me to my first auction. My neighbor was a real and serious collector of beautiful antiques and taught me how to bid at my first auction.  I still remember what it was I bid on – it was a box a lot of mixed items for $25.

Today it was like coming full circle when I went to pick up a small porcelain box I won in an auction at Converse Auctions….at 57 Lancaster Avenue in Malvern.

Converse Auctions is the business of Todd Converse, whose father is Gordon Converse of Antiques Roadshow fame.

I stumbled across the notice for the recent online auction somehow – Facebook maybe – and decided to register.

I never in a million years thought I would win anything because most of everything that was in the auction was out of my price range. But there was one little tea caddy box that I thought was lovely so I bid on it and for $60 it became mine. That is the fun thing about auctions: you just never know.

Anyway it was a totally fun experience, and for those looking for places to consign better antique items, they accept consignments for future auctions!  And every Tuesday they offer free appraisals during   business hours – just contact them for details.

Find Converse on the web at http://www.converseauctions.com or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ConverseAuctions

And while we are talking shows and auctions one of my favorite shows is coming up – The Chester County Antiques Show!

The Chester County Historical Society (CCHS) is widely respected as one of the Commonwealth’s premier history museums and educational centers, playing an important role in history education, cultural diversity and economic impact for the Southeastern Pennsylvania region. In its 35th year, the Chester County Antiques Show is CCHS’s largest community and fundraising event.

Chaired by Francis “Fran” B. Jacobs II. and Chuck & June Piola, the show will be held from April 7-9, 2017 at the Phelps School. The Phelps School in Malvern is a unique facility which features accessibility, spaciousness, and natural light that will create the perfect setting for the vendors and all of their antique items.

The theme of this year’s event is Botany. The show attracts visitors and collectors every year to view its variety of items and furniture. We invite you to support the 35th annual show by becoming a sponsor of this one-of-a-kind Chester County tradition.

Friday, April 7 – Preview Party – 5pm early admission ($200 per person)
6pm regular admission ($140 per person)
Saturday, April 8 – General Admission from 10am to 6pm – $15.00 per person (Lectures included)
Sunday, April 9 – General Admission from 11am – 5pm – $15.00 per person. Children 10 and under FREE.


Categories: Pennsylvania

Near-Record Warmth, Thunderstorms Possible This Week In Pennsylvania

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Mon, 2017-02-20 14:14
This week's weather forecast includes spring-like temperatures and even a chance of thunderstorms.
Categories: Lower Merion

Theresa's Next Door Hosting 'Canwood Derby,' A Pinwood Derby With Beer

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Mon, 2017-02-20 10:00
Make a derby car with an empty can of beer. Feel free to empty the can anyway you want, but drinking it is preferred.
Categories: Lower Merion

List Your Job on Patch!

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Mon, 2017-02-20 07:19
Find a new job or post a job opening on the all new Patch Jobs!
Categories: Lower Merion

Circle That Date: Coming Events In Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Mon, 2017-02-20 07:17
What's going on? Check the Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch calendar for what's happening in town.
Categories: Lower Merion

This week's Foreclosures around Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Mon, 2017-02-20 07:00
Foreclosures listed for sale in and around Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood could provide opportunities to move into a home you couldn’t afford otherwise...
Categories: Lower Merion

Why is Meehan standing Pat?

Heron's Nest - Mon, 2017-02-20 06:11
I used my print column today to talk about Pat Meehan.

The 7th District Congressman recently announced that he would not seek the GOP nod to challenge incumbent Democratic U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr.

The interesting question is why?

I have a couple of theories.

It has to do with BT and AT. That stands for Before Trump and After Trump.

It's a new political landscape out there.

I'm not sure Meehan wanted to put his neck on the line in a dicey statewide contest when he routinely rolls to victory in the 7th District, which has been made almost a GOP lock through the wonders of redistricting.

An off-year election in which Americans might still be steamed at the policies of Donald Trump, and looking to take it out on Republicans up and down the ballot? No wonder Meehan took a pass.

You can read the column here.
Categories: Pennsylvania

If this is global warming, I'll take it

Heron's Nest - Mon, 2017-02-20 05:52
Happy Presidents Day.

Yes, check your calendar. It really is Presidents Day. Feb. 20. I know that might seem a little hard to fathom after the weekend we just enjoyed.

It never ceases to amaze me what a little sunshine and warm temperatures - we actually hit 70 degrees about 4 p.m. - can do for your outlook.

Usually about this time of the year, I am bundled up on the sofa, watching golf on TV from some beautiful location, and wondering why I put up with this three months of misery every year.

Here's what I did yesterday: Took a nice long walk with my wife, sat outside and read the Sunday paper, then actually finished a book I have been trying to finish off since last summer.

Then, I chipped a few golf balls around the back yard.

The the Mrs. and I did some nature walking, actually hiking along some open space that runs through our development that neither of us had ever explored, despite living there for more than 30 years.

In other words, I wanted to spend every glorious minute I could outside, and that's exactly what I did.

It's chilly this morning, but certainly not the bone-numbing cold we expect at this time of the year.

And there is more good news in the forecast. We're heading back to the 60s later this week and could even break back into the 70s on Thursday.

The best part? No snow on the horizon.

If this is global warming, I'll take it.

Get the full forecast for the week here.
Categories: Pennsylvania

Last Week's Top Stories In Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Sun, 2017-02-19 21:10
LMHS b-ball shows support for rights; a local massage parlor searched; a marijuana grow house bust; and more.
Categories: Lower Merion

cooking up sunday “gravy” memories

Chester County Ramblings - Sun, 2017-02-19 15:05

My father’s mother, my paternal grandmother was not an easy woman. She was incredibly strong, the oldest breast cancer survivor I ever knew (savage mastectomy in the 1940s, lived into her 90s), and her relationships, including with all of us was a complicated relationship at best.

She and my father had periods of detente and I know they loved each other but there were many years were they just didn’t get along, especially after my grandfather died. I still remember the night as a little girl when my father came home after seeing his mother after Pop Pop had died. 

My paternal grandmother, whom I called Grandmom, in a photo taken by either my uncle or one of my cousins. She would’ve looked like this when I was a teenager.

Anyway, I remember creeping down the steps to see him, and stopping in the doorway to the living room and silently going back upstairs. I will never forget the visual of him sitting next to a single lit lamp in the living room on 4th street smoking cigarette after cigarette, staring off at I don’t know what.. At his feet were boxes of his childhood – books and what not. 

I loved my paternal grandmother, but some times growing up I didn’t like her very much. She is a woman who was truthfully better with adults than children, and she had a closer affinity for my aunt and uncle’s children because they were closer to her than my father was. Truthfully my aunt and uncle and cousins seemed to resent having to share her with my immediate family at any time, it was like they felt they had proprietary rights to her or something.

And that was OK with me. I understood it even when I was little and really didn’t understand it, if you know what I mean. They just needed her more for whatever reason. 

 But sometimes the relationship was more normal with Grandmom and she would do things like come out to our house and babysit us while my father traveled on business when mother had to accompany him.
That is where my memories of her Sunday pasta sauce, which she (Grandmom) and my great aunts called gravy, came from.

I remember being a teenager and younger with the smells wafting up the stairs to my bedroom circling the rooms like a comfortable quilt. The smells were intertwined and co-mingled: fresh coffee perking and onion and garlic cooking. There she would be, at the stove with a big wooden spoon stirring the sauce in an apron she made – she made great aprons – I still have one somewhere.

Me as a little girl with my grandmom and the German Shepherd my father hated named Lily Marlene who eventually went to live with my Uncle Jack.

So much like the smell of Christmas cookies baking in the oven, or Thanksgiving dinner aromas filling the air, the smell of pasta sauce being made on a Sunday morning is very much a feeling of home and family for me.

She would start with the onion and garlic and if there were peppers or mushrooms, those as well. They would meld together in olive oil with salt in the bottom of a crazy heavy cast aluminum pot that had a wooden handle and the wooden knob on the lid. My mother whom she gave this pot, still uses this pot to this day. I use my vintage Dansk Dutch oven.

If she was making meatballs or sausage she would brown her meat in a frying pan. I don’t do that anymore, I cook everything in the oven and drain off the grease. My grandmother always had lamb or pork neck bones to add to the sauce. The lamb and particular adds a level of flavor that I still find amazing and prefer to this day. But it’s often hard to find these little neck bones as there are fewer and fewer real butchers out there.

To the vegetables in olive oil in the pot once they were cooked down almost to the point of caramelization at times, she would add tomatoes, tomato purée, and tomato paste. When I was little I also remember going through this ritual at my great aunts with the tomatoes that came out of my Aunt Rose”s garden that my Aunt Josie would put up at the end of every growing season.

The tomatoes were canned in the basement kitchen that my great aunt had for this purpose. I still to this day can see in my mind’s eye how beautiful all the jars of pickles and tomatoes were lined up next to one and other like little rows of soldiers.

Me at Easter as a baby with my mother and my maternal grandmother whom I called mumma

My great Aunt Rose and her husband my Uncle Carl, lived in the “country” as it was referred to by the others. They had moved to Collegeville after they were married and build a house on a large plot of land next to a farm that had horses. Of course today, what was their house, sits set back off of busy Ridge Pike in the midst of commercial and residential development. But I will always remember it with the memory of a child: next to a farm and lots of apple trees and a big kitchen garden and a sort of gruff German Shepherd named Lancelot.

The thing about all of my great aunts, and the reason I write about them so often, is because the memories I have with them in particular are very, very happy. They did not get into the middle of the battles between my father and his mother and his siblings.  

Mind you, I never really blamed my father for any of this because I don’t care for my aunt and uncle, and as an adult after we buried my father, I pretty much decided right or wrong I was finished with those familial relationships. I remember something my father used to say when I was little and it was “sometimes, guilt is just wasted.”


Sadly, my father’s siblings made it easy for me to reach this decision as an adult. My aunt is just not someone I’m ever going to be close to, she just is who she is. I am somewhat ambivalent when it comes to her because I never really grew to love her as a child, felt her coldness, and as an adult she never really chose to know me. So after a while you just stop trying with people like that, even if they are family.

My uncle, however, is a very different story. When my grandmother was in her final decline before she had passed, she and my father had made their peace with each other. He was actually spending time with her almost regularly and I think it was good for him. But there was this one day when my father and I had gone to visit Grandmom in her nursing home and my uncle had driven down from Buffalo to see her.

My father with Aunt Josie before one of his Saint Joe’s Prep dances

There we were, all standing somewhat awkwardly around my grandmothers bed – her deathbed if we’re honest about what was going on. My uncle brings himself up to his full height (he was a little taller than my father – my father was 6 feet tall) and he looks at my father with righteous indignation and tells him how my father was a “bad son.”

 And it went on from there.

At first I was shocked. I couldn’t believe even with all the animosity he exhibited towards daddy over the years, that anyone would be so cruel as to do this over their mother’s death bed. Never shying away from anything (even when I probably should), I told my uncle off. Right there, right then, in that moment. The thing I will never forget about that is my grandmother did not say a word, but she looked at me from her pillow…..and smiled. 

When my father died, my aunt was there. I don’t remember if any of her kids were there but she was there. My uncle, my father’s only brother, wasn’t. He made some lame excuses how he was just “too busy” to come to the funeral. That was the moment I decided completely free of guilt, that I was done trying to pretend to care about and have a relationship with my uncle. And I pretty much sent him a letter telling him so.  

I did try, out of respect, to have a relationship with my aunt one last time after my father had passed, but I came to the sad realization that she didn’t really want a relationship with me, there was too much water I think under the familial bridge. I let that relationship just go. I think my sister hears from her occasionally, but I really don’t know and I don’t ask. 

 I have a memory of my father’s  sister from after my grandmother died, and I’m not sure if my father was still alive or not.  I had contacted her to ask for some of my father’s baby pictures, so I’m thinking he was no longer with us. And I received a box in the mail of photos of my father ripped out of family photo albums I never knew existed in the first place. It was really odd to go through the photos as I have never seen any of them before. Part of me wondered what the rest of the photo albums look like, and the other part of me realized I never would know.  I was grateful to receive the photos and thanked her properly, but it was still all a little odd.

Now that I let my aunt and uncle go the ones I stay in touch with the most are the cousins my father loved the most. The children of his beloved Aunt Helen. Much like my great aunts, they are just lovely people with hearts full of love. They don’t judge or criticize or critique, they are just happy to be family. I love them too.

It’s weird how the smells of cooking something in my adult kitchen can provoke so many memories. But when the memories bubble to the surface I like to write them down now. I want to remember all the memories and the happy feelings these people gave me as a child. And that’s not because I had some kind of an awful childhood, because I didn’t. These people are my roots.

Something I feel is really important are roots. So many people are rudderless today, and they never pay any homage to their roots. I might’ve spent a childhood that some people considered breathing rarefied air between Society Hill and the Main Line, but always more important than any of those experiences, were these old people in my life. 

And not just on my father’s side, but on my mother’s as well. Being from pure peasant stock is actually kind of cool. And I like to acknowledge it because I think it makes up who I am as an adult in my own right. I also acknowledge them because they always got me, which is something I appreciated in them even as a child.

My paternal grandparents on their wedding day.

I’m only sorry that these people aren’t around today to see my life, to see me happy with my own family. But somehow for every pot of Sunday gravy or sauce that I make I think they know.

I write these memories down because I have no daughters and I do not at this point have grandchildren, so a lot of these traditions passed me may eventually die with me, if I don’t write them down and try to pass them on. So I think if I write these things down, the traditions won’t be lost and someone, maybe someone I don’t even know will carry on these things I learned to cook in the kitchens of my great aunts and my parents.

And out of the older relatives, predominantly it was the women who made an impact on me as a girl growing up. All of these women were strong independent individuals in their own right. My memories of both my grandfathers and my Uncle Pat (P.J.) are more fuzzy and less defined because I was young when all of them passed away. I have photos of my maternal grandfather, but sadly I don’t have any photos of my paternal grandfather as he would’ve been when I was a little girl before he died. Nor do I have photos of P.J.

Now I’m going to go back to my own sauce- it’s time to add the herbs and spices and tomatoes. And when the sausage comes out of the oven it will go into the sauce and it will all simmer, filling my house with the smells and memories of my childhood.

Happy Sunday.


Categories: Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Wow! House Roundup: Amazing Bucks County Barn, $6M Delco Retreat, Farmhouse With 3 Outbuildings

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Sun, 2017-02-19 08:00
Take a look at the properties that will have you living in the lap of luxury in Pennsylvania.
Categories: Lower Merion

Give Blood At Narberth Ambulance Next Week

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Sat, 2017-02-18 10:00
You can sign up for time slots online or by calling the Red Cross.
Categories: Lower Merion

Check out the Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch Calendar

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Sat, 2017-02-18 07:51
The Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch Calendar has the goings-on. Check it out!
Categories: Lower Merion

Looking to Rent? Search New Listings in Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Sat, 2017-02-18 07:03
Whether you want pet-friendly or pool access, new apartments, condos and houses to rent hit the market everyday. Browse the latest.
Categories: Lower Merion

lost and found

Chester County Ramblings - Fri, 2017-02-17 15:39


I was rearranging my cookbooks and going through some older ones that were my mother’s at one point, and when I open one cookbook it was like opening Pandora’s box. Old photos and recipes. One recipe was hand typed by someone for my mother, and I remember her making this cake. I think this was a childhood friend’s  mother’s carrot cake recipe.

The other recipes were torn out of magazines and print publications. 

These are all from the late 1960s and early 1970s. I thought it would be fun to share.



Categories: Pennsylvania

Details Emerge In Case Of Norristown Teacher Who Assaulted 3-Year-Old Girl: DA

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Fri, 2017-02-17 15:11
The teacher was alone in the room with his students during nap time when the alleged assault occurred, police said.
Categories: Lower Merion

Ardmore Music Hall Presenting 'Best Of' Show Featuring School Of Rock Musicians​

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Fri, 2017-02-17 14:30
School of Rock students from the Main Line, Newtown, Downingtown, and Wilmington will perform Saturday afternoon in Ardmore.
Categories: Lower Merion

Philly Heroin Bust Takes 4,100 Doses Off The Streets: Pennsylvania Attorney General

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Fri, 2017-02-17 13:53
Authorities seized 125 grams of bulk heroin in the bust, as well as 200 heroin bricks in a Johnstown, Pennsylvania bust.
Categories: Lower Merion

$50M Sports Complex Proposed In Montgomery County: Study

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Fri, 2017-02-17 12:44
Tourism officials are pushing for a massive new sports complex in Montgomery County large enough to host national events.
Categories: Lower Merion

Burglar Rappels Down 40 Feet From Ceiling Of KOP Costco To Steal Jewelry: Cops

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Fri, 2017-02-17 11:47
Ninja-like, the burglar rappelled from the ceiling of the King of Prussia Costco, where he stole jewelry, police said.
Categories: Lower Merion