Feed aggregator

Minister defrocked over son's gay wedding will speak at St. Luke's United Methodist Church in Bryn Mawr

Main Line Times - Wed, 2014-04-16 10:12
When Frank Schaefer decided to officiate at his gay son’s wedding, he didn’t think that he was being brave but rather a “loving father.”
Categories: Lower Merion

Video: Car caught in Gladwyne ford

Main Line Times - Wed, 2014-04-16 10:12
The driver of an Acura SUV got stuck in the ford at Old Gulph Road at  Millcreek Road in Gladwyne during heavy rains Tuesday afternoon. The driver was able to get out safely.
Categories: Lower Merion

Bala Post office using point of service technology

Main Line Times - Wed, 2014-04-16 09:14
April 15, as most of us know, is tax day. Though 80 percent of Americans use e-filing, it is still a busy day for the United States Postal Service.
Categories: Lower Merion

Republicans Respond to Emergency Responder Shortage by Cutting Emergency Responder Benefits

Keystone Politics - Wed, 2014-04-16 08:48
In the face of what State Fire Commissioner Edward Mannis is calling a serious shortage of emergency responders House Republicans are looking at making some “hard choices”, and...
Categories: Pennsylvania, Politics

The Daily Numbers for Wednesday, April 16 (The Wawa Edition)

Heron's Nest - Wed, 2014-04-16 07:57
The Daily Numbers: 50 years in business today at Wawa.

1, as in Store No. 1 for Wawa, on MacDade Boulevard in the Holmes section of Ridley.

640 stories today.

25 new stores per year for the next 5 years, the company’s growth goal.

6 states where you can find a fix for ‘Gotta havva Wawa,’ including new stores in Florida.

380 of them that offer gasoline.

6,000 items you can buy at the Delco-based convenience stores.

22,000 employees

400 million customers annually.

195 million cups of coffee brewed each year.

60 million hoagies made annually.

1803, when Wawa started as an iron foundry in New Jersey.

1902, when Wood family started dairy farm processing plant in Wawa, Pa.

6 core values of the chain laid out in new book, ‘The Wawa Way.’

0, what it will cost you today to get a coffee at Wawa. They are offering free java all day as part of the celebration. 3.5 minutes, the time it takes most people to get in and out of the store.

5,000 dollar donation being made today at the original Ridley store to the Ridley United Soccer Association.

Call me a Phanatic: A look at the ups and downs of being a Philadelphia sports fan.Look on the bright side. The Phils got rained out last night. We didn’t have to watch through our fingers when Ryne Sandberg went to the bullpen. And even better, the Sixers play the last game of their miserable season tonight. They should have made admission free.

I Don’t Get It: All those losses and the Sixers still don’t necessarily get the top pick. They don’t have as many ping-pong balls as the Milwaukee Bucks.

Today’s Upper: Kudos to Wawa on 50 years of serving Delco and the region.

Quote Box: “Wawa has become more than just a retailer, it’s become part of our community and a part of our customers’ lives.”

- Howard Stoeckel, vice chairman of the Wawa Board of Directors and author of ‘The Wawa Way.’
Categories: Pennsylvania

Free Coffee at Wawa Wednesday for 50th Anniversary Celebration

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Wed, 2014-04-16 07:51
Wawa is turning 50 and you're invited to the party.
Categories: Lower Merion

'Live From the Newsroom' tackles Flyers' chances in Stanley Cup Playoffs

Heron's Nest - Wed, 2014-04-16 07:09
There is good news, better news and some bad news on the sports front today.

The good news? The Phillies game vs. the Braves got rained out last night, so we were not treated to another gruesome look at what constitutes the Phils' bullpen these days.

The better news? The Sixers will play their final game in this God-forsaken season tonight at the Wells Fargo Center vs. LeBron James and the Miami Heat. If they had a conscience they'd make admission free. If they wanted to make money, they'd make the people then pay to get out.

And the bad news? Brace yourself Flyers fans.

We used our 'Live From the Newsroom' show last night to preview the Flyers first-round matchup in the Stanley Cup playoffs vs. the Rangers.

All three of our sports writers, Flyers beat writer and sports editor Rob Parent, Matt DeGeorge, who just covered the Frozen Four, and Bob Grotz like the Rangers.

Most believe the Flyers will fall in either six or seven games.

The key likely will be whether the Flyers can muster a win in Madison Square Garden, where they have dropped eight straight games.

It was left to me to stick up for the locals. I'm picking the Flyers in seven. And yes, I have my fingers and toes crossed.

If you missed the show, you can catch the replay here.
Categories: Pennsylvania

Celebrating 50 years of 'Wawa runs'

Heron's Nest - Wed, 2014-04-16 05:55
In a lot of places, they might visit their local convenience store.

Hit the 7-Eleven.

Slurp a slurpee.

In the Philly area, we don't do that.

We make "Wawa runs."

We've been doing it for 50 years.

In fact, it was 50 years ago today, that the store with the funny name first opened the doors to their original store on MacDade Boulevard in the Folsom section of Ridley Township.

And today they're throwing a party to celebrate. And that includes free coffee at all Wawa locations.

The party will kick off at 6 a.m. at what is referred to as Wawa Store No. 1.

Visitors will step back in time - a half a century in fact - to get the feel and experience of what it was like on April 16, 1964. There will be 50th anniversary decorations, photos and the original signage for the store. Officials also will unveil the original pole sign. Store workers will be dressed in vintage store uniforms.

Former Wawa President and CEO Howard Stoeckel will pour the ceremonial first cup of coffee to kick off the day.

Wawa Chairman Dick Wood will re-enact the first-ever store transaction and unveil a special plaque dedicated to Wawa founder Grahame Wood.

Customers also will have a chance to check out a Wawa parade through the ages retrospective, showcasing visual milestones of the past 50 years.

Stoeckel also will autograph copies of his book, "The Wawa Way." In it he talks about how the business came to acquire its funny name and he lays out the six core principles that have led to its success.

The event will conclude with a special ribon-cutting to commemorate Wawa's half-century in business.

And of course all day customers will be rewarded with free coffee at all Wawa stores.

Later this morning, a similar celebration will be held in Philly at the 17th and Arch location from 8-8:30 a.m. "Wawa Day" will conclude with a special reception at the Convention Center and announcement of The Wawa Foundation, a new entity founded by Wawa to support the company charitable giving and philanthropic activities.

All of this to celebrate a story with a funny name. Yes, Wawa is the American Indian name for the Canadian goose native to this area.

That single store on MacDade Boulevard has grown into a convenience store behemoth with more than 640 stores that stretch beyond the Philadelphia region down into Maryland, Virginia and now even Florida. The company has more than 22,000 employees.

Today's "super" Wawas feature gas pumps and a dazzling array of food inside.

But it's still the people - and their interaction with loyal customers - that remains at the heart of the "Wawa Way." It also helps when you have your own personal Wawa. At the Daily Times, we've been lucky to have one of those quaint old stores withing walkin distance just a block away.

That's why today, as we've been doing for 50 years, most of the region will be making a "Wawa run."

Happy 50th, Wawa.
Categories: Pennsylvania

Unattended Backpacks Cause Bomb Scare at Finish Line of Boston Marathon

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Tue, 2014-04-15 21:40
The bomb squad detonated two suspicious backpacks found in Boston near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
Categories: Lower Merion

#PA13: Leach endorsed by PSEA and NEA

Keystone Politics - Tue, 2014-04-15 20:22
State Senator Daylin Leach, a hopeful in the 13th congressional race, received the official support of two organizations that don’t have the greatest respect for his opponent, Representative...
Categories: Pennsylvania, Politics

#PA13: Arkoosh releases campaign ad entitled “Sarah”

Keystone Politics - Tue, 2014-04-15 18:30
In other areas of the country, the Affordable Care Act has become something Democrats run from and Republicans frame as the symbol of failed Democratic Party policies, but in Pennsylvania’s...
Categories: Pennsylvania, Politics

The Daily Salvo for April 14, 2014 - "Jeb's Gibberish"

The Daily Salvo - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:25
The Daily Salvo for April 14, 2014 - "Jeb's Gibberish"
If a man gives his fiance a stolen engagement ring is that considered "an act of love" Governor Bush??? From: The Daily Salvo Views: 1 0 ratings Time: 01:01 More in News & Politics

Lower Merion police investigating Merbrook Lane home invasion

Main Line Times - Tue, 2014-04-15 17:08
Lower Merion police confirm a home in the unit block of Merbrook Lane In Merion has been broken into. The invasion happened about 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. The thief ransacked the home and encountered the resident.
Categories: Lower Merion

Gov Signs New Pa. Laws on Reporting of Child Abuse

Ardmore-Merion-Wynnewood Patch - Tue, 2014-04-15 16:59
The bills further expand those who are mandatory reporters and increases the penalties for mandatory reporters who fail to act.
Categories: Lower Merion

they don’t make women like that anymore

Chester County Ramblings - Tue, 2014-04-15 16:36

South Philadelphia, July, 1935. My father is the little baby in everyone’s arms, and at that point less than a month old

Chester County is home to many cool artists, writers, filmmakers, and so on. One of my favorite contemporary authors is Lisa Scottoline. She calls Malvern home base.

I was drawn to Lisa’s books initially for the Philadelphia-area settings. But my affinity grew with the characters in her books who lived in the little neighborhoods in South Philadelphia like the one where my great aunts, Millie and Josie lived once upon a time. A lot of Lisa’s books had characters based in a way on her life experience and once she became a columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer, some of what she wrote was also based on her mother, Mary Scottoline.

I do not know Lisa Scottoline. I have met her at book signings over the years, including ones set up by my mother way back when she started to write. But her little nuggets of what can only be described as “growing-up Italian” have made me laugh, made me smile, and sometimes just shake my head over the years. Probably because I am half-Italian.

Lisa Scottoline fans learned via her author Facebook page that her mother, (known to readers as “Mother Mary”) passed away on April 13th, or Palm Sunday. I hate to say that is so Italian, but it’s so Italian. And I don’t mean that disrespectfully, it just to me, IS.

Here is an excerpt of Lisa Scottoline’s recent column:

Chick Wit: Mother Mary, down but never out By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist POSTED: April 14, 2014

I am very sorry to have to tell you that Mother Mary’s health has taken a dramatic and unexpected turn for the worse, so this won’t be a funny column.

Except for the fact that she is at her funniest when times are darkest.

She’s been newly diagnosed with advanced lung cancer, has moved up north with me, and has entered hospice care at my house. Mercifully, Brother Frank, Daughter Francesca, and family and friends are all around her, and she is resting comfortably. So comfortably, in fact, that the hospice nurses, who are saints on wheels, cannot believe it. One nurse asked Mother Mary if she was having any pain – and she pointed to me……Please don’t think my tone herein is inappropriate. This has always been a column about family, the ups and downs, the laughter and the tears, and I think it’s appropriate to have both here, maybe even in the same sentence.

I would guess if you’re a fan of this column, and especially of Mother Mary, that you have a great sense of humor, and the Flying Scottolines have always handled disaster with humor. In fact, catastrophe is our middle name.

That’s why you pronounce the final E, to make it Italian.

I also know that many of you have gone through this heartbreaking journey yourselves. If you have, you already know that hospice plunges you into a world different from any other, filled with irony and incongruities.

I laughed and I cried when I read this column. It made me think once again of my great aunts who lived at 11th and Ritner. It also made me think of my father whom we saw through hospice at home too. It is a very intense time when a family member goes on hospice, but it isn’t all sad. It gives you some final and very lucky times with those you love.

Please read the entire column….especially if you come from peasant stock like me.

Today my friend Bonnie Cook wrote the obituary article on Mary Scottoline and here is an excerpt:

Mary Scottoline, 90, ‘Mother Mary’ to author Lisa Scottoline BONNIE L. COOK, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER POSTED: Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 1:08 AM

Mary Scottoline, 90, formerly of Bala Cynwyd, the hilarious, sometimes profane, larger-than-life maternal figure known to readers as “Mother Mary,” died Sunday, April 13, of lung cancer at the home of her daughter, Lisa, the author and Inquirer columnist.

“We are heartbroken to report that Mother Mary passed away at home this morning, though she was at peace and in the embrace of our love. We choose to remember her as here, making us laugh,” Lisa Scottoline said Monday on her Facebook page.

Mrs. Scottoline dealt with her final two weeks the way she did everything; she was cheerful, unfazed and funny.

Near the end, when she couldn’t speak, she communicated with family and caregivers by means of a whiteboard. How are you, they wanted to know.

“Aside from this crap, I’m doing fine,” her son Frank said she wrote.

The youngest of 19 children, Mrs. Scottoline grew up in a strict family in South Philadelphia. More or less ignored, she had to fight for attention….When daughter Lisa and Serritella wrote about the rough air between mothers and daughters in their Inquirer column, “Chick Wit,” and books including Meet Me at Emotional Baggage Claim, they found that Mrs. Scottoline’s persona flowed seamlessly onto the pages.

“She loved being in the book,” said Lisa Scottoline. “Her personality and spirit was big enough for any room twice over. She stood for a good, strong, funny woman.”

The stories resonated with readers, who found elements of Mrs. Scottoline in their own mothers.

Fifteen years ago, Mrs. Scottoline (pronounced Scott-a-LEE-nee) went south to Miami Beach to live with her son, Frank. She was very well-liked, he said. She enjoyed cooking Italian meals and pampering her pets.

She always said exactly what she felt. “Thank you for today,” she once told her son.

I took a large excerpt, I know, but this is a very cool piece about a woman I wish I had known, but at the same time over the years I felt I knew on some level because I had a couple of these no nonsense yet completely amazing little old Italian ladies in my life, my great aunts.

Mary Scottoline, like my great aunts was a force of nature. She leapt off the pages written by her daughter and granddaughter. And every single time I smiled and thought of my great aunts.

My great aunts were also very opinionated and matter of fact. My Aunt Josie had been the working girl while her sister, my Aunt Millie kept house. Josie was the most direct of the two. She was the strong one, and my Aunt Millie was the softer of the two, more ladylike. Aunt Millie always had one small bottle of Coca Cola at 4p.m. every day unless she was watching her figure, and at those times she would skip it.

The aunts never married and as was the tradition, the unmarried siblings lived in the house they were born in. The other character in their life play on Ritner Street (who also never married but had a girlfriend) was PJ, my Uncle Pat (Pasquale). PJ was a gruff and lovable guy who sometimes terrified me as a little kid. He did not have a mean bone in his body, but he liked to tease his little great nieces in his big gruff voice. He also did cool stuff like make wine in the basement. PJ died when I was pretty little. I think it would have been neat to know him as I got older.

The great aunts would say things like “you kids”. As I got older I realized that meant everyone under about 60 years old.

When we stayed with them as little girls we went to early mass. As in it was still dark outside. Hence the famous family joke “it’s holier when it’s earlier.”

Millie and Josie taught me to make pasta. By feel, basically. A little of this, a little of that, and rolled out by hand on the huge ceramic topped kitchen table. (I often wonder if that table is still in my father’s sister’s garage. It was such a big table that no one has had a kitchen big enough to hold it as far as I know.) Millie and Josie’s kitchen always smelled of a combination of tomato sauce and coffee. I loved that table and all it’s drawers.

Oh and speaking of that kitchen table? Did any of you out there love the movie “Moonstruck“? Remember the scenes when they hustled everyone into the kitchen to talk at the kitchen table over coffee? I am sorry but those kitchen table scenes to me are hysterical because as a kid I remember all the grown-ups sitting around the kitchen table solving weighty world issues….over coffee. You could never have enough coffee no matter what time of day or night. And Lordy, it was all high octane strong coffee. No decaf there.

They also had a canning kitchen in the basement and I remember my aunts putting up tomatoes and pickling hot peppers and cucumbers and things when I was little. The produce came from my Aunt Rose and Uncle Carl’s garden in Collegeville. Collegeville was referred to as “the country” in those days. No developments back then, and they originally backed up to a farm with horses. (Of course today Collegeville is like one big development, but it didn’t use to be.) Aunt Rose was one of their two sisters who married. The other sister was my grandmother, Beatrice.

When we were really little girls, my sister and I often spent New Year’s Eve with our great aunts and their other little old Italian lady friends. I remember one’s name was Tomasina. We got to stay up with them as they watched Dick Clark and whomever on the little black and white television in the kitchen. They would all be clustered around the kitchen table. I think they played cards sometimes. And they gave us watered down anisette at midnight to toast the New Year with them. And did I remember to say the kids weren’t allowed to touch the television sets? We weren’t.

In the summers, the great aunts would sit on the front stoop with folding lawn chairs, and all the other ladies and their families up and down the block would come out as well to escape the heat of the large, but not air-conditioned at the time South Philadelphia row houses. The street was alive with the music of voices in Italian and English, a cacophony of sound.

All of these Italian ladies were opinionated. They said it as they felt it, and it just was. But they were also the most compassionate, smart, and loving women.

They don’t make ladies like this anymore. I am very lucky I had a few in my life, even for a while.

So Mother Mary Scottoline, I did not know you in the traditional sense, but did know you in another sense through my own personal experiences with my great aunts and their friends. If I had any anisette in the house, I would raise a toast to you, as reading about you over the years has helped me keep my memories of my great aunts alive.

To my readers, thanks for stopping by on this rainy day. Always remember what you are from, it is a part of who you are.


Categories: Pennsylvania

they don’t make women like that anymore

Chester County Ramblings - Tue, 2014-04-15 16:36

South Philadelphia, July, 1935. My father is the little baby in everyone’s arms, and at that point less than a month old

Chester County is home to many cool artists, writers, filmmakers, and so on. One of my favorite contemporary authors is Lisa Scottoline. She calls Malvern home base.

I was drawn to Lisa’s books initially for the Philadelphia-area settings. But my affinity grew with the characters in her books who lived in the little neighborhoods in South Philadelphia like the one where my great aunts, Millie and Josie lived once upon a time. A lot of Lisa’s books had characters based in a way on her life experience and once she became a columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer, some of what she wrote was also based on her mother, Mary Scottoline.

I do not know Lisa Scottoline. I have met her at book signings over the years, including ones set up by my mother way back when she started to write. But her little nuggets of what can only be described as “growing-up Italian” have made me laugh, made me smile, and sometimes just shake my head over the years. Probably because I am half-Italian.

Lisa Scottoline fans learned via her author Facebook page that her mother, (known to readers as “Mother Mary”) passed away on April 13th, or Palm Sunday. I hate to say that is so Italian, but it’s so Italian. And I don’t mean that disrespectfully, it just to me, IS.

Here is an excerpt of Lisa Scottoline’s recent column:

Chick Wit: Mother Mary, down but never out By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist POSTED: April 14, 2014

I am very sorry to have to tell you that Mother Mary’s health has taken a dramatic and unexpected turn for the worse, so this won’t be a funny column.

Except for the fact that she is at her funniest when times are darkest.

She’s been newly diagnosed with advanced lung cancer, has moved up north with me, and has entered hospice care at my house. Mercifully, Brother Frank, Daughter Francesca, and family and friends are all around her, and she is resting comfortably. So comfortably, in fact, that the hospice nurses, who are saints on wheels, cannot believe it. One nurse asked Mother Mary if she was having any pain – and she pointed to me……Please don’t think my tone herein is inappropriate. This has always been a column about family, the ups and downs, the laughter and the tears, and I think it’s appropriate to have both here, maybe even in the same sentence.

I would guess if you’re a fan of this column, and especially of Mother Mary, that you have a great sense of humor, and the Flying Scottolines have always handled disaster with humor. In fact, catastrophe is our middle name.

That’s why you pronounce the final E, to make it Italian.

I also know that many of you have gone through this heartbreaking journey yourselves. If you have, you already know that hospice plunges you into a world different from any other, filled with irony and incongruities.

I laughed and I cried when I read this column. It made me think once again of my great aunts who lived at 11th and Ritner. It also made me think of my father whom we saw through hospice at home too. It is a very intense time when a family member goes on hospice, but it isn’t all sad. It gives you some final and very lucky times with those you love.

Please read the entire column….especially if you come from peasant stock like me.

Today my friend Bonnie Cook wrote the obituary article on Mary Scottoline and here is an excerpt:

Mary Scottoline, 90, ‘Mother Mary’ to author Lisa Scottoline BONNIE L. COOK, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER POSTED: Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 1:08 AM

Mary Scottoline, 90, formerly of Bala Cynwyd, the hilarious, sometimes profane, larger-than-life maternal figure known to readers as “Mother Mary,” died Sunday, April 13, of lung cancer at the home of her daughter, Lisa, the author and Inquirer columnist.

“We are heartbroken to report that Mother Mary passed away at home this morning, though she was at peace and in the embrace of our love. We choose to remember her as here, making us laugh,” Lisa Scottoline said Monday on her Facebook page.

Mrs. Scottoline dealt with her final two weeks the way she did everything; she was cheerful, unfazed and funny.

Near the end, when she couldn’t speak, she communicated with family and caregivers by means of a whiteboard. How are you, they wanted to know.

“Aside from this crap, I’m doing fine,” her son Frank said she wrote.

The youngest of 19 children, Mrs. Scottoline grew up in a strict family in South Philadelphia. More or less ignored, she had to fight for attention….When daughter Lisa and Serritella wrote about the rough air between mothers and daughters in their Inquirer column, “Chick Wit,” and books including Meet Me at Emotional Baggage Claim, they found that Mrs. Scottoline’s persona flowed seamlessly onto the pages.

“She loved being in the book,” said Lisa Scottoline. “Her personality and spirit was big enough for any room twice over. She stood for a good, strong, funny woman.”

The stories resonated with readers, who found elements of Mrs. Scottoline in their own mothers.

Fifteen years ago, Mrs. Scottoline (pronounced Scott-a-LEE-nee) went south to Miami Beach to live with her son, Frank. She was very well-liked, he said. She enjoyed cooking Italian meals and pampering her pets.

She always said exactly what she felt. “Thank you for today,” she once told her son.

I took a large excerpt, I know, but this is a very cool piece about a woman I wish I had known, but at the same time over the years I felt I knew on some level because I had a couple of these no nonsense yet completely amazing little old Italian ladies in my life, my great aunts.

Mary Scottoline, like my great aunts was a force of nature. She leapt off the pages written by her daughter and granddaughter. And every single time I smiled and thought of my great aunts.

My great aunts were also very opinionated and matter of fact. My Aunt Josie had been the working girl while her sister, my Aunt Millie kept house. Josie was the most direct of the two. She was the strong one, and my Aunt Millie was the softer of the two, more ladylike. Aunt Millie always had one small bottle of Coca Cola at 4p.m. every day unless she was watching her figure, and at those times she would skip it.

The aunts never married and as was the tradition, the unmarried siblings lived in the house they were born in. The other character in their life play on Ritner Street (who also never married but had a girlfriend) was PJ, my Uncle Pat (Pasquale). PJ was a gruff and lovable guy who sometimes terrified me as a little kid. He did not have a mean bone in his body, but he liked to tease his little great nieces in his big gruff voice. He also did cool stuff like make wine in the basement. PJ died when I was pretty little. I think it would have been neat to know him as I got older.

The great aunts would say things like “you kids”. As I got older I realized that meant everyone under about 60 years old.

When we stayed with them as little girls we went to early mass. As in it was still dark outside. Hence the famous family joke “it’s holier when it’s earlier.”

Millie and Josie taught me to make pasta. By feel, basically. A little of this, a little of that, and rolled out by hand on the huge ceramic topped kitchen table. (I often wonder if that table is still in my father’s sister’s garage. It was such a big table that no one has had a kitchen big enough to hold it as far as I know.) Millie and Josie’s kitchen always smelled of a combination of tomato sauce and coffee. I loved that table and all it’s drawers.

Oh and speaking of that kitchen table? Did any of you out there love the movie “Moonstruck“? Remember the scenes when they hustled everyone into the kitchen to talk at the kitchen table over coffee? I am sorry but those kitchen table scenes to me are hysterical because as a kid I remember all the grown-ups sitting around the kitchen table solving weighty world issues….over coffee. You could never have enough coffee no matter what time of day or night. And Lordy, it was all high octane strong coffee. No decaf there.

They also had a canning kitchen in the basement and I remember my aunts putting up tomatoes and pickling hot peppers and cucumbers and things when I was little. The produce came from my Aunt Rose and Uncle Carl’s garden in Collegeville. Collegeville was referred to as “the country” in those days. No developments back then, and they originally backed up to a farm with horses. (Of course today Collegeville is like one big development, but it didn’t use to be.) Aunt Rose was one of their two sisters who married. The other sister was my grandmother, Beatrice.

When we were really little girls, my sister and I often spent New Year’s Eve with our great aunts and their other little old Italian lady friends. I remember one’s name was Tomasina. We got to stay up with them as they watched Dick Clark and whomever on the little black and white television in the kitchen. They would all be clustered around the kitchen table. I think they played cards sometimes. And they gave us watered down anisette at midnight to toast the New Year with them. And did I remember to say the kids weren’t allowed to touch the television sets? We weren’t.

In the summers, the great aunts would sit on the front stoop with folding lawn chairs, and all the other ladies and their families up and down the block would come out as well to escape the heat of the large, but not air-conditioned at the time South Philadelphia row houses. The street was alive with the music of voices in Italian and English, a cacophony of sound.

All of these Italian ladies were opinionated. They said it as they felt it, and it just was. But they were also the most compassionate, smart, and loving women.

They don’t make ladies like this anymore. I am very lucky I had a few in my life, even for a while.

So Mother Mary Scottoline, I did not know you in the traditional sense, but did know you in another sense through my own personal experiences with my great aunts and their friends. If I had any anisette in the house, I would raise a toast to you, as reading about you over the years has helped me keep my memories of my great aunts alive.

To my readers, thanks for stopping by on this rainy day. Always remember what you are from, it is a part of who you are.


Categories: Pennsylvania

Darfur human rights activist speaks at Villanova University, details the ongoing suffering of her people

Main Line Times - Tue, 2014-04-15 16:32
Hawa Abdallah Mohammed Salih has endured horrors that most of us will never know.
Categories: Lower Merion

Apartment burglary reported in Bala Cynwyd

Main Line Times - Tue, 2014-04-15 15:31
Lower Merion police report that an apartment was robbed in the unit block of Oakland Terrace in Bala Cynwyd on Friday sometime between 6:15 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
Categories: Lower Merion

Man admits to tampering with PECO meters in 5-county area

Main Line Times - Tue, 2014-04-15 15:28
NORRISTOWN – A Philadelphia man who tampered with utility meters to reduce some account holder’s monthly PECO electrical bills, to the tune of nearly $350,000, could generate some jail time in connection with the five-county theft scheme.
Categories: Lower Merion

Video: Car caught in Gladwyne ford

Main Line Times - Tue, 2014-04-15 15:24
The driver of an Acura SUV got stuck in the ford at Old Gulph Road at  Millcreek Road in Gladwyne during heavy rains Tuesday afternoon. The driver was able to get out safely.
Categories: Lower Merion